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Preliminary Session Descriptions

Tentative and subject to change

General Sessions and Symposia:

A General Session is a topic that is familiar to the general membership. Abstracts reflect the most current research in that field.

A Symposium focuses our attention on a specific topic within the large disciplines that make up the Society’s membership. The symposium highlights a well-defined topic that is not addressed by the regular sessions of the Annual Meeting. The format includes a single lead speaker followed by related abstracts. The lead speaker either presents the current concepts of the topic or presents cutting-edge research within the area.

Stem Cells and Other Emerging Biomaterials Topics:
Stem Cell Microenvironments
Stem Cell-Biomaterial Interactions
Adipose Tissue Engineering and Adipose-derived Stem Cells
Biomaterial-guided Stem Cell Behavior in the Musculoskeletal Realm
Biomaterials as Stem Cell Niche
Biomaterials for Directed Stem Cell Differentiation
Pluripotent Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine
Chemoselective Chemistry for Biomaterials
Cell/Organ Therapies:
Biomaterials for Cell Manufacturing
Cell and Tissue Derived Biological Materials
Engineering Therapeutic Delivery from Biomaterial Scaffolds for Cell Therapy
Cardio Vascular Biomaterials
Cardiovascular Controlled Drug Release
Cardiovascular Material Development and Biointeractions
Cardiovascular Material: Mechanisms and Lessons Learned From Decades of Spectacular Failures
Models of Cardiovascular Materials Biocompatibility
Transcatheter Heart Valve Prostheses and Other Biomaterial Innovations for Treating Heart Valve Disease
Dental / Craniofacial Materials
Dental Materials
Bio-adhesives in Dental Implants
Craniofacial Tissue Regeneration
Drug Delivery
Cancer Drug Delivery
Micron and Nanotechnology Derived Theranostic Biomaterials
Controlled Release and Presentation Systems for Regulating Cell Behavior
Targeted Drug Delivery / Polymer Conjugates
Implant Pathology
Evaluating Pathology of Cardiovascular Materials
Biofilm-Material Interactions
Nano Materials
Nanobiomaterials
Applications of Nanomaterials in Medicine
Emerging Frontiers in Design and Characterization of Bio-inspired Nanoscale Research & Materials
Immunology of Nanomaterials
Ophthalmic Biomaterials
Advances in Ophthalmic Biomaterials Technology
Ocular Drug-Delivery - A Unique Platform for Advanced Drug Administration
Orthopaedic Biomaterials
Biomaterial Technologies for Treating Non-union Bone Defects: Research Developments and Clinical Applications
Multi-factor Drug Delivery for Musculoskeletal Regeneration
Natural-based Polymeric Biomaterials and Composites
Smart PEEK Biomaterials: Engineering Tribological Surfaces and Bioactive Composites
Proteins and Cells at Interfaces
Cell Function in 2D vs 3D Culture
Engineering Immune Interactions with Biomaterials
Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Protein-Surface and Cell-Surface Interactions
Surface Characterization and Modification
Novel Imaging Methods for Mapping Cell Phenotype
Novel Surface Modification Techniques in Biomaterials for Improved Ophthalmic Care
Probing the Surface of Biology
Surface Modification and the Biological Response
Surface Modification of Three Dimensional Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications
Surface Optimization to Maximize Biosensor Performance
Tissue Engineering
Biomimetic Materials for Tissue Engineering
Engineered In vitro Tissue Model for Disease and Drug Discovery Studies
Engineering Vascularized Tissues
Glycosaminoglycan Biomaterials in Medicine
Self-Assembly in Tissue Engineering
Stimuli-responsive Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering: New Developments
Tissue Engineered Disease Models
Urological Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials
Other Areas of Interest
Collagen: How the Source and Process Affect the Product
Novel Approaches for Rapid Prototyping of Biomaterials

Panel Discussions

Panel discussions foster open debate on a topic. The invited guests include renowned experts in the area of focus and the chair allows time for open discussion with the audience.

Grand Challenges for Biomaterials Science and Engineering Research and Education
Surgeons Panel: Overcoming Obstacles to Innovation
After My Degree – Industry or Academia?
Advancing Biomaterials Education

Tutorials

Tutorials teach attendees about a specific technology or focus area. A tutorial may include up to two presenters and time for questions and answers. The invited speakers are selected for their experience in the field, as well as their ability to teach fundamental topics that are of increasing importance to a wide range of biomaterials scientists and engineers.

Chemo-selective Chemistry
Evaluation of Retrieved Implants
Hands-On Tutorial for Scaffold Fabrication
Statistics in the Design of Experiments

Workshops

Workshops provide an in-depth educational experience on topics relating to biomaterials with a significant amount of time dedicated to discussion, and questions and answers.

Surface Characterization of Biomaterials
Tour: Institute for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine (ISCRM) at the University of Washington

 

General Sessions & Symposia

Stem Cell Microenvironments
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
Due to unique properties, stem cells hold enormous potential for the treatment of various diseases. One main challenge to their use is controlling their behavior when interacting with natural and synthetic materials outside of their natural niche. Thus, the design of biomaterials systems that mimic some aspects of natural stem cell regulatory microenvironments may be a powerful tool to better understand and manipulate stem cell function as a basis for future cell-based therapeutics. This includes the physical and chemical properties of biomaterials, in addition to the delivery of soluble factors. Likewise, the spatial and temporal presentation of these cues is crucial towards their utility. This session will cover the development and understanding of biomaterial interactions with stem cells (ranging from embryonic to adult) towards application in devices, tissue engineering, and culture system optimization.

Stem Cell-Biomaterial Interactions
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
Stem cells have become a promising cell source in the tissue engineering field. Major advances have occurred in the isolation and characterization of stem cells derived from embryos, nonembryonic/adult sources, and more recently, adult somatic cells that can be genetically reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells. Intense studies have been focused at the cell and molecular biology levels on understanding the relationship between stem cell growth and terminal differentiation in an effort to control these processes. Recent discoveries have shown that the microenvironment can influence stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, which has had a tremendous impact on identifying potential strategies for using these cells effectively in the body. This session will feature presentations that describe studies examining the influence of biomaterials on stem cell behavior with an emphasis on biomaterials design that impart appropriate cues to stem cells to affect their behavior.

Adipose Tissue Engineering and Adipose-derived Stem Cells
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
Adipose tissue is a highly specialized connective tissue found either in white or brown forms, the white one being the most abundant in adult humans. Loss or damage of white adipose tissue due to aging or pathological conditions need reconstructive approaches. Free-fat transplantation rarely achieves sufficient tissue augmentation due to delayed neo-vascularisation with subsequent cell necrosis and graft volume shrinkage. Tissue-engineering approaches represent, instead, a more-suitable alternative for adipose tissue regeneration. The use of adult mesenchimal stem cells (both adipose-, ASCs, and bone marrow-, BMSCs, derived) or of preadipocytes is preferred to the use of mature adipocytes, which have low expandability and poor ability for volume retention. This session aims to collect recent scientific contributions on this not yet completely explored but emergent field.

Biomaterial-guided Stem Cell Behavior in the Musculoskeletal Realm
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Orthopaedic Biomaterials
Cells respond to environmental cues such as pH, temperature, proteins and growth factors, and numerous other parameters. Cells also respond to biomaterial properties such as relative smoothness or roughness, surface charge, mechanical rigidity, 3-dimensionality, and material content. Of interest is the manner in which cells react to these and other biomaterial-related properties, but of greater interest is whether or not these biomaterial properties can be engineered to control or guide cell behavior. This session will focus on utilizing physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of materials to guide cell behavior, specifically embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell behavior, toward the repair or regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues.

Biomaterials as Stem Cell Niche
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cell / Organ Thereapies
Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of stem cell niches in most major organ systems, and the ability of these cells to transdifferentiate towards other tissue lineages is being explored. Understanding biomaterial-stem cell interactions and biomaterial-triggered signaling pathways is critically important in developing cell culture systems and therapies for regenerative medicine. This session will present new and ongoing work in the development of biomaterial-based strategies to culture and maintain stem cells in an undifferentiated state as well as the development of new strategies to differentiate stem cells into specific lineages. Particular focus will be on maintenance and differentiation of stem cells on various biomaterial surfaces, 3D culture, and bioreactor-based cultures. Our interest is in novel materials to present biologically active species, new ways of controlling biomaterials to mediate stem cell function and phenotype, as well as fundamental biological understanding of stem cell niches and how they can be artificially controlled.

Biomaterials for Directed Stem Cell Differentiation
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cell / Organ Thereapies, Tissue Engineering
This session will focus on recent biomaterials research targeted at directing the differentiation of progenitor and stem cells towards specific tissue lineages. It will cover a range of approaches applied to pluripotent and multipotent stem cells.

Pluripotent Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine
Symposium
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cell / Organ Thereapies
Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells, are poised to become an integral component of regenerative medicine approaches. The ability of these cell types to continuously self-renew and differentiate into an array of different somatic cell types opens up new possibilities in fields ranging from in vitro drug screening to in vivo tissue engineering. Furthermore, the recent development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is likely to further expand the potential of stem cell research and therapy. However, pluripotent stem cells also present unique challenges to biomaterials scientists, as the fate of these cells can be strongly influenced, and perhaps controlled, by the physical and biochemical properties of their microenvironment. This symposium will describe new developments in pluripotent stem cell biology, with an emphasis on the key role of cell-biomaterial interactions in pluripotent stem cell culture and regenerative medicine.

Chemoselective Chemistry for Biomaterials
General Session
Recently developed chemoselective chemistries such as native chemical ligation, click chemistry, and others are enabling the design of biomolecular biomaterials with a high degree of complexity without sacrificing chemical definition and purity. Similarly, high-affinity protein-protein interactions are likewise enabling the synthesis of complex biomaterials using interactions that are also highly specific. This session will focus on biomaterial designs and syntheses that employ chemoselective approaches such as these. Focus areas for this session will include: Novel biomaterials designs that are specifically made possible by chemoselective chemistries, development of new chemoselective chemistries, adaptation of existing chemoselective chemistries to biomaterials contexts, high-affinity protein-protein interactions for constructing biomaterials, biocompatibility of chemoselective syntheses, chemoselective surface chemistry, and related areas.

Biomaterials for Cell Manufacturing
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cell / Organ Thereapies
The development of effective cell manufacturing processes is critical for the ultimate realization of clinical cell therapies and in vitro cell-based diagnostics. Biomaterials play an integral role as substrates and molecular delivery vehicles for expansion and differentiation of large populations of somatic, progenitor and stem cells in adherent and suspension culture systems. In addition to the production phase, biomaterial technologies are also important in the downstream processing stages of cell populations in order to separate cells from culture components and purify deliverable cell products. This session will highlight recent advances and promising biomaterials strategies that can significantly impact cell manufacturing.

Cell and Tissue Derived Biological Materials
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cell / Organ Thereapies
Biological scaffolds derived from natural or engineered cells and tissues represent an emerging new class of biomaterials with inherent biological activity. This session will focus on sourcing, preparation and application of biologically-derived scaffolds for stem and progenitor cell differentiation and regenerative medicine applications.

Engineering Therapeutic Delivery from Biomaterial Scaffolds for Cell Therapy
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cell / Organ Thereapies
This session will focus on the development of new materials or methods for the controlled delivery of macromolecular therapeutics, including proteins and nucleic acids, from scaffolds. Scaffold-mediated delivery has received increasing attention because of its capacity to improve cellular utilization of delivered therapies. For example, immobilization of therapeutics to the scaffold localizes therapeutic activity and elevates local concentration; in some cases, it can enhance biological activity by optimizing receptor-ligand interactions. Immobilization can also provide control over the rate of therapeutic delivery. As mimetics of the natural extracellular matrix, the scaffolds themselves provide additional physical and chemical cues that control the cellular microenvironment and cell behavior. Appropriate topics for this session include new chemistries/methods for degradation-controlled release, layer-by-layer fabrication and release, cell-mediated therapeutic release, and other triggered-release technologies. Intended application areas are broad and would include in vivo and ex vivo regenerative therapies as well as cell manipulation for other applications.

Cardiovascular Controlled Drug Release
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cardiovascular Biomaterials, Drug Delivery
The presentations will discuss novel methods for cardiovascular drug delivery. Issues to be discussed might include: drug delivery from coatings on medical devices including stents, balloons and catheters; Computational modeling of release kinetics and tissue uptake in line with recent FDA suggestions for submission materials in evaluiating medical devices; Formulation of an active pharmaceutical ingredient with an excipient can result in a range of degrees of phase separation between the API phase and the excipient phase. Domains can be co-continuous or discreet, separate phases. Characterization of the formation and stability of this coating morphology is important since this has an impact on release rate; Comparison of in vitro release kinetics to in vivo pharmacodynamics (in vivo to in vitro correlation); Pre-formulation characterization of excipient/API interactions and API solid state as it relates to release kinetics.

Cardiovascular Material Development and Biointeractions
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cardiovascular Biomaterials, Surface Characterization and Modification
Cardiovascular materials science has entered a new age. Increasingly, materials are specifically formulated for use in the cardiovascular domain. This session seeks abstracts that focus on the evolving field of cardiovascular-specific materials. Examples include discussion of: Materials synthesis and formulation issues for use in the cardiovascular space; How cardiovascular pathologies within a range of lesion types and organ systems determines criteria for materials use and optimization; How materials surface and mechanical properties can be tailored and designed to meet needs of composite assembly with coatings and drug delivery.

Cardiovascular Material: Mechanisms and Lessons Learned From Decades of Spectacular Failures
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cardiovascular Biomaterials
This session will focus on how materials science drives the development of cardiovascular materials and devices. In particular this session seeks abstracts that make the point that while cardiovascular materials science has reshaped medical therapeutics for each of the successes that can be cited there are many more spectacular failures. Abstracts should focus on how these failures in particular have promoted the next generation of successful devices. In keeping with the central themes of the Annual Meeting at the intersection of medicine, biology, pathology and materials science, abstracts should demonstrate how insights specific to the materials aspect of the device ultimately resurrected successful device development from seeming failure. Presentations should focus on understanding the modes of failure and lessons learned. Examples include heart valves, catheters, stent failures, stent fractures, circulatory assist devices, and bioabsorbable stents.

Models of Cardiovascular Materials Biocompatibility
Symposium
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cardiovascular Biomaterials
The choice and relevance of an experimental animal or human model for efficacy is challenging. Cardiovascular therapeutics are increasingly composite – a marriage of cutting edge molecular biology, pharmacology, and materials pathology. It is important to understand bioresponses to materials, to test them, and choose metrics for evaluating results. The choice of models to test materials can determine the success of a therapy, with the choices including evaluations of impacts on quality of life and economics of intervention. Abstracts and presentations should relate to models of evaluating biomaterial choice and performance in animals or humans for use in cardiovascular applications. Topics of interest might include new insights into animal models, human evaluation models (e.g., angiograms and imaging data), using medical device autopsy data, economic models for device materials requirements, and quality of life models.

Transcatheter Heart Valve Prostheses and Other Biomaterial Innovations for Treating Heart Valve Disease
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cardiovascular Biomaterials
Heart valve disease affects millions, and is only treatable with heart valve surgery. However, replacement heart valves, whether mechanical or bioprosthetic, continue to have limited outcomes. Nevertheless, a number of innovations in prosthetic heart valves are moving into clinical use such as transcatheter deployment of heart valve prostheses, bioprostheses with anticalcification technology, and novel strategies for the cardiac surgical repair of diseased heart valve leaflets. Each of these areas involves biomaterial innovations, and poses unique challenges.

Dental Materials
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Dental / Craniofacial Biomaterials
This session invites basic, applied, and clinical biomaterials research using approaches ranging from synthetic materials to biological mechanisms of therapy, and including materials/biological constructs and tissue structure-function analyses as biomimetic/design bases. Each of these approaches converge into the larger objective of restoring oral tissue structure and function. Specific interests include synthesis, characterization, processing and application of any organic and inorganic materials used or having potential for use intra-orally or extra-orally for the restoration, fixation, replacement, or regeneration of hard and soft tissues in and about the oral cavity and craniofacial region.

Bio-adhesives in Dental Implants
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Dental / Craniofacial Biomaterials
Developed surface functionalization strategies such as organosilane, phospho-SAM, and others are enabling the design of new functionalized surfaces for dental implants. In addition, bio-adhesives inspired by living creatures found in nature such as mussels, geckos, and barnacles become emerging fields as new functional adhesives. This session will focus on bio-inspired adhesives that can be utilized in dental implants. Academic focus of this session will include: development of novel bio-adhesives and surface functionalization methods mimicking natural systems from geckos, marine mussels, barnacles and related creatures that use water-resistant adhesives.

Craniofacial Tissue Regeneration
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Dental / Craniofacial Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering
Craniofacial reconstruction due to birth defects, head and neck cancer, and trauma due to accidents, violence and combat requires complex surgical correction. Technological advances in biomaterials, bioengineering and biomimetics have the opportunity to promote new and creative therapies for craniofacial tissue regeneration. The goal of this session will be to focus on the special clinical problems facing craniofacial reconstruction and the design strategies to regenerate craniofacial tissues using biomaterials, bioengineering and biomimetic approaches including the development of novel biomaterials and scaffolds, directed differentiation of progenitor/stem cells, modulation of mechanical and other physio-chemical properties of materials/tissues for guided morphogenesis, tissue printing and local delivery of therapeutics.

Cancer Drug Delivery
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Drug Delivery, Tissue Engineering
This session will cover current efforts in the area of drug delivery including the development of targeted delivery in which the drug is only active in the target area of the body (for example, in cancerous tissues) and sustained release formulations in which the drug is released over a period of time in a controlled manner from a formulation. Types of sustained release formulations include liposomes, drug loaded biodegradable microspheres and drug polymer conjugates. In addition to mechanisms directly therapeutic against cancer cells, indirect methods such as anti-angiogenic therapies, as well as other metabolic disruption (e.g. sugar, O2 transport, etc.) will be discussed. Also therapeutic delivery in regard to palliative care will also be addressed.

Micron and Nanotechnology Derived Theranostic Biomaterials
Symposium
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Drug Delivery, Nano Materials
Theranostic smart biomaterials enable the combined delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents for biomedical applications. This symposium will showcase the most recent advances in emerging theranostic biomaterials, with strong emphasis on the unique materials properties and nanofabrication for intended biological and medical applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to new organic or inorganic imaging agents (MRI, PET, SPECT, CT, optical imaging etc); hybrid biomaterials (polymer/lipid/imaging agents), new imaging methods; multimodality imaging, new methods of bioconjugation or encapsulation for theranostic micro/nano formulations; cell/drug/gene delivery using theranostic biomaterials with focuses at molecular, cellular and tissue levels. A specific application of theranostic biomaterials is synergistic diagnostic imaging and therapeutic therapy for cancer nanomedicine. This symposium will build up a platform by integrating materials science, biology, and bioimaging for the promotion of theranostic nanomedicine.

Controlled Release and Presentation Systems for Regulating Cell Behavior
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Drug Delivery, Nano Materials
Drugs, growth factors and cytokines, and genetic material can be extremely powerful agents for directing cell behavior to regenerate tissues or combat diseases. One-time presentation of these bioactive factors through bolus delivery or burst release from biomaterials, however, often does not elicit the desired cellular responses. Temporal control of the delivery of these factors may allow for optimal exposure to cells. This control may be achieved using biomaterials or novel substrates via a variety of mechanisms including diffusion, polymer degradation, and environmental stimuli-driven release. In additional, spatial regulation over delivery may also be beneficial to, for example, mimic soluble signal gradients present during development and healing processes. This session will encompass the development of new biomaterial systems that modulate the spatial and temporal delivery of soluble signals and the quantitative evaluation of their capacity to guide specific, desired cellular functions.

Targeted Drug Delivery / Polymer Conjugates
Symposium
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Drug Delivery
The efficacy of therapeutic compounds is often reduced by the limitations of conventional drug delivery systems. For example, non-specific targeting typically results in adverse side effects and drug wastage. More advanced drug delivery systems are being developed to passively and actively target specific tissues, particularly those that are cancerous or inflamed. This symposium will highlight both particulate carrier systems and soluble macromolecular carriers designed to prevent toxicity at non-target organs and optimize therapeutic effectiveness. Examples of targeted drug delivery systems include liposomes, micelles, nanoparticles, microspheres, lipoproteins, antibodies, dendrimers, and soluble synthetic polymers.

Evaluating Pathology of Cardiovascular Materials
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Implant Pathology, Cardiovascular Biomaterials
The choice and relevance of an experimental animal or human model for efficacy is challenging. Cardiovascular therapeutics are increasingly composite – a marriage of cutting edge molecular biology, pharmacology, and materials pathology. It is therefore increasingly important to understand the unique pathobiologic responses to these materials, to test them, and to intelligently choose metrics for evaluating results. This session will focus on the issues related to pathology and toxicity of cardiovascular-specific materials. Examples include mining human heart database information, animal model prediction of (pre)clinical results, and selection of patients for clinical tests. The choice of models and metrics influences the success or failure of a therapy, with the choices including evaluations of impacts on quality of life and economics of intervention. Abstracts should speak to models of efficacy in animals, models for evaluation in humans (e.g., angiograms and imaging data), opportunities and limitations in medical device autopsy data, economic models, and quality of life models.

Biofilm-Material Interactions
Symposium
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Implant Pathology, Proteins and Cells at Interfaces, Surface Characterization and Modification
As a biomaterial is implanted a race for its surface ensues. If the surgery and implant are clean enough, the initial film formed is composed of small molecules followed by proteins, other large molecules and cells, led by monocytes/macrophages. If bacteria interrupt this process and establish a beachhead they can form a film that seals them into an anaerobic culture chamber where they can produce a life-threatening infection. Since 80% of hospital acquired infections are associated with implants or indwelling devices, there is a great need to develop surfaces that resist biofilms yet incorporate optimally into the surrounding tissue. This symposium will explore these biofilms and strategies to prevent them. A plenary speaker will set the tone by defining the problem and current research to find solutions for it. Speakers will report their new insights into understanding biofilms and new tactics to overcome them.

Nanobiomaterials
Rapid Fire Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Nano Materials
Nanobiomaterials is a multidisciplinary scientific field with roots in life science, material science and nanotechnology. The basic and application researches of nanobiomaterials have been the hot topic in the materials research for biomedicine and biotechnology, which have developed quickly in biomedical implant and intervention medicine, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and drug/gene delivery system. This session will focus on the potential of nanobiomaterials including biocompatible surface, tissue engineering and regenerative materials, new drug/gene delivery system and bioanalysis system, with an attempt to explore their possible applications in clinical practice.

Applications of Nanomaterials in Medicine
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Nano Materials, Dental / Craniofacial Biomaterials, Orthopaedic Biomaterials, Ophthalmic Biomaterials
This general session will focus on all applications of nanomaterials in medicine. A comprehensive range of nano-materials will be considered including nano-particulates/fibers, nanocoatings, nanocomposites, NMES, etc. A comprehensive range of medical applications of such nanomaterials will also be considered (including tissue regeneration for the following tissues: orthopedic, cartilage, vascular, dental, nervous system, cardio vascular, etc.; drug delivery; ophthamological applications; cancer treatment; dermatological applications; etc.).

Emerging Frontiers in Design and Characterization of Bio-inspired Nanoscale Research & Materials
Symposium
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Nano Materials, Proteins and Cells at Interfaces, Surface Characterization and Modification
This symposium provides a forum comprised of groups with like-minded design ideas but different end-use applications. The focus is on design elements requiring nanoscale science and technology. Presentations will highlight advances in biomaterials where mechanisms inspired by living systems have led to new functional materials. Emphasis is on challenges and opportunities in developing the next generation of bioinspired self-assembling, self-healing, self-evolving, and/or self-replicating materials by identifying the challenges in obtaining detailed understanding of biological events and how to effectively interface them with the design and fabrication of new biomaterials. This involves groups: synthesizing biomaterials with the intent of obtaining a previously determined nanoscale biological structure, using biomimetic synthesis strategies to obtain nanoscale structures, and characterization of nanoscale structures at the biological interface to provide input constraints for a future biomaterial or to confirm the design intent of an existing material.

Immunology of Nanomaterials
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Implant Pathology, Nano Materials
It was assumed by many pioneers of nanotechnology that nanoparticles were “too small” to evoke an immune response. Their ability to associate with other active groups, however, has made them both suspect and useful. One result has been their employment in stimulating therapeutic antibody formation. Research in both pathological and therapeutic behavior of nanomaterials will be presented Although abstracts directly addressing innate and adaptive immune responses will have priority, those that address macrophage and, particularly dentritic cell responses will be eligible because of the pattern recognition receptor connections.

Advances in Ophthalmic Biomaterials Technology
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Ophthalmic Biomaterials
The ophthalmic biomaterials arena is a rapidly growing field for advanced biomaterials research with wide-spread clinical applications. For the 2010 SFB meeting, we invite you to a renewed session toward next-generation ophthalmic care. The topics encompass novel biomaterials technology for functional replacements of ocular tissues; surface modification and protein adsorption of polymers used for refractive devices; vitreous replacement fluids; retinal tamponades; and glaucoma drainage devices. The general session will focus on the progress of biomaterial-tissue interaction in development of next-generation ophthalmic drugs and medical devices. E.g. Investigation of tissue interactions (ciliary muscles) with ocular biomaterials for restoring lens accommodation. The session will also accommodate advances in ocular tissue-engineering. This year’s meeting will feature a list of renowned academic, industrial, regulatory, and clinical speakers to highlight the advancement in ophthalmic biomaterials research. Keynote addresses from experts in the clinical setting will allow means to bridge the gap between materials research and clinical success. The general session on ophthalmic biomaterials will be a unique opportunity for all researchers to share and renew collaborations in a rapidly growing field.

Ocular Drug-Delivery - A Unique Platform for Advanced Drug Administration
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Ophthalmic Biomaterials, Drug Delivery
The ophthalmic biomaterials arena is a rapidly growing area for advanced biomaterials research with wide-spread clinical applications. For the 2010 SFB meeting, we invite you to a renewed focus of biomaterials toward next-generation ophthalmic care. The scope of the session encompasses advances in next-generation systemic ophthalmic care using local/controlled delivery to the anterior and posterior segment of the eye. Topics including novel drug formulation (molecular and biochemical bases for various degenerative ocular diseases), drug encapsulation, microspheres, targeted drug delivery, posterior segment microdialysis, latest technology in gene-therapy for retinal diseases, and development of drug/device combination products with lens/cornea/probes are invited. This year the meeting will feature a unique list of renowned academic, industrial, regulatory, and clinical speakers to highlight the advancement in ocular drug delivery. Keynote addresses from regulatory representatives will allow means to bridge the gap between research and development.

Biomaterial Technologies for Treating Non-union Bone Defects: Research Developments and Clinical Applications
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Orthopaedic Biomaterials
Treating bone non-union defects remains a major clinical challenge. A significant number of approaches utilizing synthetic bone grafts have been developed and proven to have applications in bone repair and regeneration. This session will focus on bone graft design and fabrication, bone graft osteocompatibility and vascularization strategies, such as factor loaded grafts and programmed cells, to develop clinically relevant grafts for effectively treating non-union bone defects. This session will also cover pre-clinical evaluation (non-union animal models) of synthetic bone grafts and their clinical applications.

Multi-factor Drug Delivery for Musculoskeletal Regeneration
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Drug Delivery, Tissue Engineering, Orthopaedic Biomaterials
This session will focus on multiple growth factor or cytokine delivery for musculoskeletal regeneration. This approach can be used to enhance single tissue regeneration, or to achieve multiple tissue types within one scaffold. The session will cover biomaterials design to achieve temporal and spatial control of multiple factor delivery, release studies and in vitro testing, as well as in vivo proof-of-concept results.

Natural-based Polymeric Biomaterials and Composites
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Orthopaedic Biomaterials
Natural-origin polymers and its composites offer excellent opportunities in the biomaterials arena. This versatile class of materials includes biopolymers (polyhydroxy alkanoates, hyaluronic acid), polysaccharides (starch, chitosan, chitin, alginate) or proteins (collagen, soy protein isolate, silk fibroin) enabling developing engineered systems with enhanced biological performance. The innovative use of its characteristics, taking advantage of the similar structure and composition with respect to biological tissues, enables designing high performance solutions for biocompatibility, biodegradability and bioactivity of biomaterials. Also emerging technologies including tissue engineering, drug delivery systems and smart/active/adaptative systems can benefit with the wealth of natural polymers existing in nature. Those high end applications require increasingly complex and demanding architectures and properties. Furthermore, processing and characterization of natural origin polymers often have specific requirements and limitations. This session will be the forum of choice to present and discuss cutting edge research on biomaterials obtained from natural based polymers.

Smart PEEK Biomaterials: Engineering Tribological Surfaces and Bioactive Composites
General Session
Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is now widely used in spine and orthopedic implants as a structural biomaterial because of its inherent chemical stability, radiolucency, and biocompatibility. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the development of structural PEEK polymer composites for tribological applications, as well as new developments in modifying the biomaterial to enhance its biologic response. This session will include abstracts related to all aspects related to engineering “smart” PEEK biomaterials, including surface treatments, cell response, porosity, coatings, and bioactive composites. This session will also include the tribology of PEEK biomaterials in articulations with metallic and ceramic counterfaces, and novel methods of manufacturing PEEK composites and bearing surfaces.

Cell Function in 2D vs 3D Culture
Symposium
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Proteins and Cells at Interfaces, Tissue Engineering
Though cell culture on 2D flat substrates is comparatively easy, 3D scaffold systems for cell culture can more accurately represent in vivo conditions leading to more physiologically relevant cell behavior. This symposium will explore benefits of 3D culture systems and investigate how and why they differ from traditional 2D systems.

Engineering Immune Interactions with Biomaterials
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cell / Organ Thereapies, Proteins and Cells at Interfaces
Implanted biomaterials of synthetic or biological origin (or a combination of the two) undergo complex interactions with the immune system. However, these interactions are incompletely understood and poorly controlled, making it difficult to engineer them to achieve desirable outcomes in clinical applications. This session highlights current efforts toward both a basic understanding of interactions of immune cells with biomaterials as well as the engineering of biomaterials capable of directing or influencing immunological processes. These efforts have wide-ranging implications in diverse fields such as tissue engineering, combination products, and therapeutic vaccines.

Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Protein-Surface and Cell-Surface Interactions
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Proteins and Cells at Interfaces
While it is well recognized that biological responses to implanted biomaterials (e.g., inflammatory responses, platelet adhesion, and thrombus formation) are governed by proteins that adsorb on the biomaterial surfaces, relatively little is understood regarding the actual molecular mechanisms that control these types of interactions. Without a molecular level understanding of the factors that mediate these processes, biomaterials design to control them is essentially relegated to trial-and–error methods. Unfortunately, given the great complexity of protein-surface and cell-surface interactions, the probability of finding optimal conditions by such approaches is negligibly small. Therefore, although very challenging, increased efforts need to be made to study and understand the molecular basis for protein-surface and cell-surface interactions so that this knowledge can be applied for device design for improved biological performance. The objectives of this session are to spot-light this important area of research and provide a venue to present and discuss current research efforts in this area.

Novel Imaging Methods for Mapping Cell Phenotype
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Proteins and Cells at Interfaces, Surface Characterization and Modification
Controlling cell phenotype is a critical step in developing successful tissue and organ replacements. This is not easily accomplished due to the myriad of factors at several different length scales that influence cell response and subsequent tissue development. Therefore, novel imaging approaches that can quickly and effectively provide correlations between cell environment and response are required. This session will showcase novel in vitro and in vivo 2D and 3D imaging techniques and probes that provide spatial information about the effect of cell/material interaction and surrounding environment on cell phenotype.

Novel Surface Modification Techniques in Biomaterials for Improved Ophthalmic Care
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Ophthalmic Biomaterials, Surface Characterization and Modification
The ophthalmic biomaterials arena is a rapidly growing area for advanced biomaterials research with wide-spread clinical applications. For the 2010 SFB meeting, we invite you to a renewed focus of biomaterials toward next-generation ocular care. The scope of the session encompasses advances in surface modification of polymeric biomaterials for ophthalmic applications. Topics of interest include advances in biomaterial surface modification, coating technology, thin-films, plasma treatment, and advanced characterization technologies. This year the meeting will feature a unique list of renowned academic, industrial, regulatory, and clinical speakers to highlight the advancements of surface modification in the ocular arena. Keynote addresses from academic experts on surface modification technology will set the tone for the session and allow opportunities for collaborative growth and development in this rapidly growing field.

Probing the Surface of Biology
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Surface Characterization and Modification
As surface analytical tools become more sensitive, researchers are provided the ability to use these techniques to image or probe a biological surface. Surface analytical equipment used to characterize metals and plastics are now being used to probe biological materials that were previously sensitive to these analytical techniques. Methods for sample preparation (preserving structure), environmental chambers or improved data collection have lead to this improvement. This session will focus on the imaging of biological structures using spectroscopic or microscopic surface characterization techniques. Relevant research using AFM, SIMS, ESCA (XPS), SPR or other surface analytical techniques performed on biological proteins, cells, matrices, etc. are recommended for this session. Abstracts submitted to this session should include data from multiple surface sensitive methods.

Surface Modification and the Biological Response
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Surface Characterization and Modification
When a device is implanted into the body, into either hard or soft tissue, the body will respond. While the bulk material of the device is often important for mechanical success, the device surface is at the interface with biology. Major effort has been spent modifying a biomaterial surface in order to elicit or inhibit a biological response. This session will focus on novel surface modification techniques that control healing, coagulation, thrombosis, bone degradation, etc. Such modification techniques could include conjugation, thin film deposition, texturing, coating, etc. Abstracts submitted to this session should include background on how current surface technology has failed in a particular application and how new surface modification will improve the outcome. In depth characterization of the modified surfaces is highly recommended for this session. Characterization could include XPS (ESCA), AFM, SIMS, SEM, SPR, ATR-FTIR, or other surface analytical techniques. In particular, it is important to understand how the modification scheme has induced a different biological response.

Surface Modification of Three Dimensional Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering, Surface Characterization and Modification
Traditional modification methods such as migratory additives, plasma treatment, and photo-grafting have been successfully developed for scaffolds where cell contact is expected primarily at the scaffold surface. However, as the tissue engineering research progresses into creating three dimensional scaffold materials where cellular in-growth into the scaffold will be deemed essential, new modification methods will be required to overcome the challenges encountered by the traditional methods (such as depth of penetration in case of photo-grafting) when modifying three dimensional scaffold materials. This general session aims to present and discuss new developments in such “surface modification” approaches related to grafting and patterning of small molecules, polymers, and/or ligands on a three dimensional scaffold. Abstracts related to characterization methods to ascertain a successfully modified three dimensional scaffold are also welcome. Abstracts focusing on methods to overcome challenges encountered when modifying and/or characterizing three dimensional scaffold materials compared to two-dimensional cell culture are especially encouraged and will be given priority.

Surface Optimization to Maximize Biosensor Performance
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Nano Materials, Surface Characterization and Modification
Surface modification is a necessary prerequisite to optimize performance of the latest generation of biosensors including nanoparticles, protein chips and gene chips. From simple 1” x 3” microarray glass slides with hundreds of spots to higher density microarray chips (e.g. AffyMetrix®) with over 10,000 spots per cm2, the surface chemistry needs to be engineered and optimized to facilitate automated oligonucleotide synthesis, provide stability to maximize signal to noise during hybridization and during signal read-out via automated fluorescence imaging. The immediate technology focus is molecular diagnostics but the methodologies to be discussed have relevance to any surface modification where retention of specific biomolecular activity is desired under a specific set of conditions. This session will bring together Seattle area researchers and will solicit contributions from various local centers of molecular biology research, national centers as well as international.

Biomimetic Materials for Tissue Engineering
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
Recently, biomaterial scientists have added bioactivity to their design toolbox in the development of new materials for tissue engineering scaffolds. These advanced biomaterials add another dimension of guided interaction with the body by mimicking the native remodeling processes, e.g. biological recognition of adhesion sites, substrate-dictated differentiation, or cell-guided enzymatic degradation. This session will review current state of the art in the development of biomimetic scaffold materials and the fundamental studies that use these materials to identify key substrate characteristics that support desired cellular behavior in tissue engineering constructs (adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation).

Engineered In vitro Tissue Model for Disease and Drug Discovery Studies
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
There has been much focus on developing in vitro 3D tissue models as current 2D in vitro cell culture systems do not mimic in vivo tissue environments. Engineered 3D tissue models are powerful tools for disease and drug screening studies. They have the potential to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo research as well as to reduce the use of animals and overall R&D costs. This session will introduce the latest research in engineered 3D tissue models for the study of disease pathogenesis and tissue-therapeutic agent interactions.

Engineering Vascularized Tissues
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering, Cell / Organ Thereapies
One of the major challenges in developing complex, three-dimensional tissues is the need for a vascular network to maintain cell viability within the interior of a scaffold. Because of the diffusion limitations of oxygen, in vivo cell viability is often limited to a ~100-200 mm depth within the scaffold. Vascularization thus is an important consideration in larger and thicker tissues. This session will focus on novel techniques for addressing these issues through design of tissue-engineered scaffolds that are prevascularized in vitro or biomaterials that promote and enhance vascularization in vivo.

Glycosaminoglycan Biomaterials in Medicine
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
Harnessing the polysaccharide biomacromolecules of the extracellular matrix has attracted many research groups and led to a large variety of clinical biomaterials. What can we expect in the future for chemically-modified GAGs? Abstracts are invited describing pre-clinical and clinical uses of derivatives of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, heparin, chitosan, and other GAGs, including hard and soft materials, nanostructured or microfabricated materials, and novel chemistries.

Self-Assembly in Tissue Engineering
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
Recreating the complexity of tissues and biomimetic architectures is one of the major aims of tissue engineering. One approach to do this is by using self- or directed assembly approaches. This session will cover bottom-up approaches that are utilized to create tissues to serve as in vitro tissue models and as potential therapeutic tissue engineered constructs. The session will cover areas such as modular tissue engineering, microengineered scaffolds as well as biomimetic tissue constructs. These approaches have emerged as suitable methods of recreating the complexity of tissue structures and enhancing the function of engineered tissues. This session will also include self-assembled gel/biomaterial based strategies for developing suitable scaffolds to grow and cultivate cells and strategies to promote self-assembly of cells within 3D. These materials may include self-assembled peptides, polysaccharides, lipids, nucleotides and viruses as tissue engineering materials.

Stimuli-responsive Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering: New Developments
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
Tremendous research has been done in recent times to use polymeric biomaterials to guide three dimensional tissue formation both in vitro and in vivo. While both biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymers have been used for these applications, the stimuli-responsive polymers in both categories may offer unique advantages to achieve appropriate cell attachment, growth, morphology, and biological function. This general session aims to present and discuss new developments in the approaches and materials that are responsive to environmental cues. Abstracts dealing with in vitro cell behavior (morphology and function) on advanced materials that are responsive to the cellular microenvironment are solicited. The externally controllable experimental variables may include (but not limited to) temperature, pH, and/or cellular products. Since a viable tissue engineered product is expected to contain spatially arranged multiple cell types, abstracts pertaining to creating environmentally sensitive materials that are suitable for culturing multiple cell types are especially encouraged.

Tissue Engineered Disease Models
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
Microenvironmental conditions play an important role in the development and therapy of many diseases, and biomaterials may be invaluable in the generation of more appropriate culture models that will help to identify the underlying mechanisms and effects. The overall theme of this session will be on the design and utilization of biologically inspired model systems to study fundamental mechanisms involved in the pathology and treatment of complex diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal disorders. In particular, it will highlight biomaterials, tissue engineering, and microfabrication approaches to evaluate these conditions as a function of specific cell-microenvironment interactions including but not limited to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions and mechanical cues. This session will be of broad interest to both the academic and industrial community. Furthermore, it will provide a communication platform for biomaterials scientists and basic biologists interested in the development and utilization of innovative and biologically relevant culture microenvironments.

Urological Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials
General Session
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering
Despite the early success of bladder tissue engineering, urology is a field of medicine that has received little attention from the biomaterials / bioengineering community. This session will discuss the potential application areas and clinical issues that current and future biomaterials technologies target.

Collagen: How the Source and Process Affect the Product
General Session
Collagen based biomaterials have made important contributions to health care, medical device breakthroughs, new methods of drug delivery, cancer treatment, tissue engineering fields and cell based assays. This session will apply to all aspects of collagen and collagen blend biomaterials including preparation, characterization, quality control, applications in diagnostics and medical devices. Presenters are encouraged to highlight research in analytical chemistry techniques, process engineering, cell based assay development, tissue engineering constructs and medical devices. Contributions in basic and applied collagen research are welcome.

Novel Approaches for Rapid Prototyping of Biomaterials
General Session
Direct writing technologies, including microcontact printing, fused deposition modeling, selective laser sintering, inkjetting, and laser direct writing, involve layer-by-layer growth of three-dimensional structures. These technologies have traditionally been used in the microelectronics, defense, and automotive industries. More recently, direct writing technologies have been used to process cells and materials for use in medicine and dentistry. This general session will review recent developments in rapid prototyping technologies for fabrication of tissue substitutes, biosensors, drug delivery devices, and medical instruments. Various aspects of the rapid prototyping process, including processing of radiographic images, development of computer models, novel direct writing processes, and biocompatible materials for use in direct writing will be discussed. This general session aims to create collaboration and discussion among the many groups involved in the development and use of rapid prototyping technologies, including biomaterials engineers, medical scientists, medical device manufacturers, equipment manufacturers, and clinicians.

Grand Challenges for Biomaterials Science and Engineering Research and Education
Panel Discussion
In 2009 the National Academy of Engineering issued a list of fourteen Engineering Grand Challenges that must be addressed to achieve a sustainable, economically robust, and politically stable future (http://www.engineeringchallenges.org/). The two NAE Engineering Grand Challenges most relevant to biomaterials are "Engineer Better Medicines" and "Engineer the Tools of Scientific Discovery." However, these alone do not come close to encompassing the spectrum of critical issues faced by modern biomaterials science and engineering. A panel of seven esteemed members of the National Academy of Engineering, National Academy of Science, and the Institute of Medicine will present their thoughts on the scientific, engineering, clinical, regulatory, ethical and educational Grand Challenges facing the research, education and business communities that comprise the Society For Biomaterials. Topics include but are not limited to molecular mediation, drug delivery, organ restoration, tissue reconstruction, sensing, diagnostics, imaging, wound healing, prosthetics and cosmetics. It is hoped that a multi-component “Biomaterials Manifesto” will arise from this event.

Surgeons Panel: Overcoming Obstacles to Innovation
Panel Discussion
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Cardiovascular Biomaterials, Dental / Craniofacial Biomaterials, Orthopaedic Biomaterials, Ophthalmic Biomaterials
Successful innovation in the field of biomaterials requires careful planning and a knowledge of the processes involved and the obstacles to overcome. The purpose of this program will be to give a brief overview of the experiences and challenges today regarding biomaterials and implants and where we think we will be tomorrow. The following topics will be addressed during this panel discussion: the process of innovation; intellectual property; academic/industry collaborations and associated conflicts of interest; off-label use of implants; the +/- of clinical trials; and obstacles specific to biologics. While many of the examples that will be used are related to orthopaedics, the experiences can be relevant to other medical disciplines.

After My Degree – Industry or Academia?
Panel Discussion
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Biomaterials Education
This panel and networking luncheon will provide an opportunity for graduate students to explore different career options. Speakers from industry and academia will discuss their career paths and provide insight and advice. Each lunch table will include students and at least one SFB leader or member currently in academia or industry. After the presentations, there will be time for students to network and discuss their questions.

Advancing Biomaterials Education
Panel Discussion
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Biomaterials Education
This is a multi-faceted panel discussion to address topics of interest in biomaterials education both at the college level with new methodologies & techniques as well as changing the way biomaterials-related courses are taught to produce better qualified graduates. Advantages and shortcomings of current graduates will be addressed. Additionally, K-12 outreach module development will be discussed. The focus on outreach is designed to address the issue of slowing the ‘leaky pipeline’ with respect to the loss of potential engineers.

Chemo-selective Chemistry
Tutorial
Increasingly, biomaterials are being synthesized from biomolecules and polymers that possess complex chemical reactivity, necessitating the use or development of highly chemoselective conjugation techniques. Recently developed approaches such as native chemical ligation, click chemistry, chemoselective surface modification, and engineered protein-protein interactions offer powerful routes for precisely constructing highly defined biomaterials from such complexly reactive biomolecules and polymers. This tutorial will provide an overview of recently developed chemoselective chemistries, along with practical guidance and tips for avoiding common pitfalls associated with them. The tutorial will be directed at two audiences: those wishing an overview of available chemoselective chemistries for synthesizing specific biomaterials of interest, and those currently employing chemoselective chemistries who may be seeking a forum for troubleshooting aspects of these evolving techniques. The tutorial will close with a short question-and-answer discussion session with the panel for this purpose.

Evaluation of Retrieved Implants
Tutorial
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Biomaterials Education, Implant Pathology
How do we evaluate forensically whether an implant is biocompatible? Development of a biomaterials course with a lab section should be one goal of a comprehensive bioengineering curriculum. Not only would this be a useful introduction ot implant pathology, but it would provide practical experience in implant evaluation. In this tutorial an expert in retrieval pathology would present example cases. Each would be examined from three perspectives: 1) Biomaterial characterization, 2) Clinical experience, and 3) Host response to the implant. This will be followed by a discussion of future prospects for the field.

Hands-On Tutorial for Scaffold Fabrication
Tutorial
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Dental / Craniofacial Biomaterials, Proteins and Cells at Interfaces
Many intriguing strategies for fabricating 3D tissue scaffolds have been developed. Are you interested in learning these approaches? Would you like to learn how to electrospin nanofibers? How about directing assembly of microgels? What about freeform fabrication of designer scaffolds? This “hands-on wet tutorial” will provide practical information on several scaffold fabrication techniques with “wet” demonstrations by experts and opportunities for hand-on instruction. Any level of scientist from beginner to advanced is welcome. The only requirement is a desire to learn new scaffold fabrication techniques.

Statistics in the Design of Experiments
Tutorial
Knowledge of statistics is fundamental in designing and explaining the biological experiments. Every student and researcher should understand basic concepts of statistics and know how to use them in their experiments.

Surface Characterization of Biomaterials
Workshop
On April 21st at the 2010 SFB symposium, the National ESCA and Surface Analysis Center for Biomedical Problems (NESAC/Bio) will be running a workshop on “Surface Characterization of Biomaterials.” An overview of the latest developments and advances in biomedical surface analysis will be given. The fundamentals and capabilities of ESCA and ToF-SIMS will be emphasized. Selected examples of recent surface analysis applications in the areas of biomedical nanoparticles, molecular depth profiling of polymeric biomaterials, 2D/3D imaging of biological samples, and analysis of biological molecules at interfaces will be presented. Attendees will gain an appreciation for detailed characterization biomedical surface analysis methods can provide for a wide range of biomaterials.

Tour: Institute for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine (ISCRM) at the University of Washington
Workshop
Sponsored by the following Special Interest Group(s): Tissue Engineering, Cell / Organ Thereapies
A tour of the new Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine (ISCRM) at the University of Washington’s South Lake Campus is planned. Participants will view the facilities and equipment used for stem cell research, and will have the opportunity to interact with ISCRM researchers and bring about possible research collaborations. This event is to be held in tandem with the NESAC/Bio surface analysis workshop (Wednesday morning – April 21, 2010, Ratner group) at the UW main campus. On Wednesday around noon, participants are to be provided with a box lunch at the ISCRM. Following lunch, an overview presentation of ISCRM research areas and facilities will be given to the tour participants. Following the overview, participants will be given a choice of ISCRM laboratory tours (Pluripotent stem cell core, Histology and imaging, Magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy, Cardiovascular biology and, maybe, Spinal cord regeneration, Retinal regeneration) to talk with the researchers, see experiments, view research poster presentations and better understand the science and the equipment used to pursue the research. The participants will select two labs each that they would like to see in order to enable small groups (10 persons each) to tour each lab.